times of refreshing

August 10, 2004 | 7 Comments

Was doing some study for a teaching a few weeks ago and ran across a little insight I’ve thought about a number of times since…

In Acts 3:19, Peter is speaking to a crowd in Solomon’s Colonnade. He tell them that times of refreshing will come when they repent and turn to God. The word refreshing in the original language carries the idea of a cooling that comes from a breeze.

However, there is also a medical meaning to this term. Luke, the author of Acts, had a medical background, so certainly this meaning would have been familiar to him. The word can also mean the healing that comes when a wound is exposed to the open air or breeze. Not to be lost on this is the fact that the word breath or breeze is also the word for Spirit.

So the idea is that when we open our hearts and reveal our sins to God, his Spirit is able to come in and heal the wounds. What better way to look at sin than a wound to our lives that needs to be healed by God?

  • guest

    May I encourage you all to avoid jumping to conclusions about my motives. Thanks.

  • Lucy,
    Sorry if you thought I was jumping to conclusions about you — not my intent. I was just trying to further develop our conversation about sin.

  • Nash

    Lucy,

    I apologize if that is the way it seemed to you. By vagueness of your post, you really didn’t leave anyone with much else to go on, good or bad, so I did my best not to pin any unknown history or motives on to your thoughts. You feel I was unsuccessful in that, and I apologize.

  • guest

    That was from me, Lucy

  • guest

    This is the way I think of it too. It is much more compassionate I think, as most of what we call sin arises due to bad childhood experiences or ways parents relate to children which create behaviour patterns in adulthood, and this way of viewing sin removes the judgment that traditional christian views place on people.

    Lucy

  • Lucy,
    I agree, but I think sin is also more than that. I don’t think we can remove the responsibility from ourselves. Sin is most often the result of our own bad choices. I see them as wounds, because in essence, we are doing damage to the full life that God intends for us everytime we use our lives in a way that is countrary to how he designed them.

  • Nash

    Lucy,

    I see where you’re going with your comment, and it seems to be that this might be motivated by personal experiences, whatever the case may be. But I would encourage you, and other people of similiar mindset, to not ignore the responsibility that we have for our own sin. This is more then a traditional Christian view, this is very much a Biblical view. We can’t be those people who go on talk shows and blame our bad lives on our parents’.

    I know just from my own life, I was raised in a very conflicted environment in Southern California. A good deal was spent in the “nicer” Orange County area, private schools, etc. But a good deal of it was also spent exposed to the large underground drug/gang scenes of Orange County and Long Beach. So I have grown up with these experiences and such in my “formulative” years.

    There have been many times as a Christian (which I didn’t become until I was 17, and living in Mesa, Az), where I failed or succeeded in my struggles with sin, God, and life in general. While it would be easy to attribute these successes to my private schooling and such, and blame my failures on the rough experiences I had early on, I chose not to do that, because I desire to view myself as something more then just a victim of circumstance.

    Maybe you are legitmitally a victim of some sort of circumstances, but again you are encouraged to grow beyond that and past that and truly allow God to be that healing force that John talked about. Surrendering yourself and your actions to the conclusion that you are a victim of early experiences is not only unhealthy, I would go so far as to say that it is lazy and irresponsible. Such people need to define those moments, before the moments define them.