whew

January 5, 2005 | 3 Comments

If you watch my reading list at all, you saw this one up there for quite a while. I just finished it tonight. It’s a fascinating book about the origins and the make-up of the cosmos itself. It’s very well written and translated into laymen’s terms. Even so, I don’t recommend it unless you are very interested in this topic. I was interested enough, but there are concepts splattered all over the wall behind me because they flew right over my head.

It would be too much to go into all the theories he presents in this blog, but here is one quote of interest from the beginning of the last chapter: Physicists spend a large part of their lives in a state of confusion. It’s an occupational hazard. To excel in physics is to embrace doubt while walking the winding road to clarity.

Shouldn’t we be able say this of pastors and theologians as well? Sometimes we are so concerned about having our faith just right that we don’t like any blurry lines. It gets dangerous when we think we have everything laid out just right.

For example, I’m fairly convinced that neither Calvinism nor Arminianism is right. I’ve yet to find a clear stance in the middle ground. However, I’m pretty comfortable with the mystery of that.

Can we say the same things about pastors that Greene says about physicists? Pastors spend a large part of their lives in a state of confusion. It’s an occupational hazard. To excel in theology is to embrace doubt while walking the winding road to clarity. It is not our firm answers that we lead us to a deeper understanding of who God is. Instead, it is the questions that arise out of our uncertainties that drive us forward into the mystery.

  • davidkw

    hey what isn’t clear about my stance, punk? God gave me a natural fence groove on my back side.

  • krystofer

    dang! i really like that take. and concur that anyone who says they have all the answers is full of poo

  • Pguin

    there has to be at least some answers… God isn’t totally fuzzy, but I agree that we need to accept that we don’t need EVERY answer to find and follow him.
    I worry that in our new way of expressing dissatisfaction with previous generations of followers of Christ that 2 things are happening…
    1. We are in danger of giving almost no credit to believers of faith and of substance who have come before us but after Christ.
    2. The our dissatisfaction with followers comes across to none believers as dissatisfaction with Christ.

    It’s almost like we are in need of of other’s to validate God for us, rather than God himself.