So I Had This Idea…

and its about to ship.

There is tragic flaw of ambition that I share with many others. It leaves my own ideas lying dormant while squashing the dreams of others. Based on my highly scientific rough guess, it plagues 39% of all regular internet users. For readers of this blog, I would estimate it (highly scientifically) to be much higher.

It is known as Dormant Domain Syndrome – DDS for short, with all apologies to the dental professionals in my life, former and current.

Dormant domain syndrome begins as a spark of an idea for the next website we will create. Once it comes to us, we can do nothing else. We pour through potential domain name options, neglecting our jobs, families and good hygiene until we find just the right domain. Often, it involves ill will toward some other sufferer of DDS who long ago began their own squat on our first, second and third domains of choice. But we are not abated. We thesaurize until we find just the right domain and we pounce, racing through the registrar’s upsells until we get verification that it is ours.

A week later, the idea seems silly, stupid even. A year later, we renew the domain anyway, because…you never know. But there is one thing I know you know, right now. You know what I’m talking about.

A few weeks ago I had such an idea, and as I logged into my vault of DNS dead ends, I saw an autobiographical sketch of ideas past. It led to this tweet, the response to which only served to affirm that I am not alone:

But I forged forward that day, scrambling through possible names lest someone else be experiencing the identical serendipitous brilliance at that very moment. I landed on a domain I loved, completed the registration, secured the twitter name and imagined the glory to come.

As it oh so occasionally happens, the dreams gave way to details as I began to pull the direction of the new project together. I coded away while kids drifted into dreams and my wife depleted another box of tissues on the couch beside me during Call the Midwife.

I recognize I am well past the standard 140 character attention limit of our time, so if you are still with me, thanks for reading. And all this serves only as an introduction to tell you that I have put together a new project that I’m excited to share with you.

Next week I will be launching Sermonsmith.com: a podcast of conversations about the craft of sermon preparation. Twice a month, I will publish an interview with a church leader who regularly engages in the creative and sacred act of preaching.

If you’ve followed this blog for any amount of time, you will know that I’m enamored with the creative process. I’m interested in learning about the tools, rhythms, workflows and soul care that goes into any process of making stuff. For me, and many others who I’m honored to journey with, a primary creative expression is the act of preaching. And while the creative process has been a popular topic for many years now, there hasn’t been much of that talk particular to art of writing sermons. So, I’m going to start.

I’ve been initiating conversations like these for some time, so it makes sense to start setting up a mic and share what I learn with others. Later today, I will be recording my first interview with my good friend J.R. Briggs. Assuming all goes well, it should be published early next week, and we’ll be off and running. The next two interviews are already scheduled, and I won’t run out of interesting interviewees anytime soon.

Whether you preach or not, you’re welcome to listen in. The site is already live, or you can subscribe through iTunes, RSS, Twitter or Facebook. Fax subscriptions are not available.

3 comments
timoteostewart
timoteostewart

@johnchandler , I really resonated with the way you felt when you looked at all your registered domain names. I'm the same way! My namecheap.com list of registered domain names is like a trail of breadcrumbs from one idea to the next. Here's to hoping that sermonsmith is an idea of yours that's built to last.

As a treat, here are definitions for Saturday-night special and Saturday-night syndrome, two terms that the clientele you're trying to serve via sermonsmith might be familiar with... http://bit.ly/133tjWX (PDF).

johnchandler
johnchandler moderator

@mikegoldsworthy Glad to hear it, because you are already on my list of people to invite for an interview. :)